Not in the mood for social media

What happens when you don’t feel it?

Not in the mood for social media? Here’s what to do

What happens when you’re not in the mood for social media?

I’ve noticed there’s an ebb and flow to my relationship with social. When I’m really connected to my message, I feel inspired and on fire, ready to show up and share every day.

At other times, when I’m overworked, haven’t had enough sleep, or tellingly, have spent too much time on social media, I can get in a bit of a funk. Ideas don’t flow.  I’m lost for words. And – shock horror – there are days when I just can’t really be bothered.

I’ve come to accept the ebb and flow as part of my rhythm. There are times when I push forward and other times when I need to pull back. And while it’s true that consistency on social media will drive results in your business, there are times when the best thing to do is take a break.

Say what?

I’m not suggesting you give social the silent treatment for weeks on end.  But sometimes a few days breather is just what you need to get your mojo back.  Sure your stats might drop for a wee bit, but in my view you are better to take a breather and come back fresh, than to keep churning out content without real heart or intention.

There are also things you can do to prepare for those natural ebbs in your enthusiasm.

  1. Create a stockpile of memes – Next time you have a spare moment or are watching something mindless on TV, hop on Pinterest and search for quotes that speak to your area of expertise or to your audience’s struggles. Save these to a dedicated board and then recreate those quotes using your own colours, images or branding. To save time, you can find someone on Fiverr to do this for you – just be sure to always attribute the quote to the original source.

This will give you a bank of content that you can schedule whenever you find yourself stuck for motivation or simply need a break from social.

  1. Create a library of “greatest hits” – If you have posts or ideas that do really well on social, save them to a file or a spreadsheet. You can either recycle these posts directly, create a new post, or share a new take on the same idea or theme.

While some argue that posts should never be recycled, I disagree. Ideas that make a big impact now may well make a big impact in six months or a year from now, and we need to build on and reiterate those concepts that resonate.

Besides, many people won’t have seen that first post – you will have new followers who have joined your page since and we all know that the algorithm means that not all our followers see every post.

In addition, we have to hear a message at the right time, to inspire us to take action. Some who saw it the first time may not have been ready to hear it.  And a lot of people won’t even remember seeing the first version – in fact, you may even find the same people will like or comment on the new post as if seeing it for the first time.
So if you have ideas that do well, that get good engagement, that get people thinking and talking, save those into your greatest hits file and revisit them when you fall into a lull.

  1. Post about what’s in front of you – Just share what’s happening in your day-to-day world, what you saw on your daily walk, what you’re pondering. Allow yourself to be a little reflective and share those thoughts and challenges with your tribe.

Not every post has to be info packed,  a full tutorial, or a mind-bending new philosophy. Accept the natural ebbs in your enthusiasm for social, and you’ll fall back into flow much more quickly.

Need more flow in your social media? Come on over and join my FREE Facebook group, the Content Collective, for regular content challenges, mini-workshops and feedback.

 

 

Christine
[email protected]

Christine Sheehy will help you refine your core message, find your authentic voice and show up boldly online, so you can grow your tribe of loyal followers AND your business. She teaches women entrepreneurs how to consistently create engaging content and stand out in a noisy online world, through journalling challenges, messaging coaching, copywriting and intimate writing retreats. Christine writes, dreams (and persistently tries and fails to give up coffee) from a seaside village near Matakana, New Zealand.

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